Season Schedule

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September 2017

Weight, wait... I didn't know that: strategies for a more healthful you!

Mike Hoog, Physical Therapist


Presenter's Essay and Bio

Presenter's Essay

I have been a practitioner of physical therepy for over 27 years. So why would a PT be providing a lecture on weight control and mindful eating? I guess the simplest answer is that I look at my patients from a holistic point of view, rather than a simple diagnosis. I treat the “whole person,” and believe it or not diet can play a huge role in a patient’s recovery and positive outcome. 2 out of 3 Americans are either overweight or obese in this country. Almost every patient that walks through our doors has some issue with food, either too heavy or too thin or malnourished due to poor eating habits.

I felt like I needed to "up my game", in areas of: Mindful or Mindless eating, weight control, and nutrition to better serve my patients. The one book that really influenced me on this quest for knowledge is titled “Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think” by Brian Wansink,. Brian is a Stanford Ph.D. and the director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab. This book is easy to read and chuck full of information regarding human behavior towards food and what we can do to manipulate our environment to reduce our need for will power and begin to eat more mindfully.

About the Presenter

Mike Hoog

As a teenager and a young adult, I guess I have always been influenced by my parents. My mom was a CRT operator and my Dad was a physical therapist for the Public Health service. My mother was a talker, super social and loved people and interactions with everyone. She would always say things like, "guess who I bumped into at the grocery store." My dad, he too was a talker but he was more reserved and passionate. These two crazy people were responsible for who I am today. I got the gift of gab from my mom and the calm passion influence from my pop. These two qualities I feel are a nice combination for my profession.

My grades out of high school were not that great. I went to a junior college for two years then transferred to San Francisco State University. My grades improved and I worked at a PT office in Marin County part time while picking up night classes: anatomy, kinesiology etc. I graduated with a BA in Physical Education from SF state. I applied to PT schools and in the meantime I took EMT courses. I decided if I didn’t get into PT school I would try to become a firefighter. During the EMT training I realized that I really missed the interactions with people. The Emergency Medical profession is all about rescue and racing to the ER. I wanted to know about the people I was helping, how they were post trauma, etc. I wanted a relationship with them…but the profession did not provide this interaction.

After 4 months of anxious waiting, "the letter" arrived from New York University (pause for triumphant music)…. I lived in Manhattan for 2 ½ years studying and learning, both in life and therapy. For a short time, I loved living in a big city. I felt as if I was living at the epicenter of the world. The twin towers were still standing when I graduated in 1990.

I have been a physical therapist for 27 years now, mostly working in an outpatient setting. My patient population is young adult to seniors and I love them all. People ask me if I ever get bored working on the same body part, back, neck etc., and I say "heck no," because each body part is attached to some really interesting individual that I have the privilege of getting to know.

In addition to working with people, the other thing I think is really great about my job is that I am constantly learning and adjusting my practice to be as effective and efficient as I can be while still trying to make therapy fun and challenging for my patients. I have been a yoga practitioner for over 10 years and I have recently integrated Dry Needling to my practice to help with musculoskeletal healing. I focus on the “whole person,” not just a body segment. I am taking a more integrated approach and it seems to be benefitting my patients as well as my own longevity as a physical therapist.

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September 2017

Math Circles

James Taylor


Presenter's Bio

Presenter's Bio

James Taylor

James Taylor founded the Math Circles Collaborative of New Mexico and the Math Teachers' Circle of Santa Fe. James has led math circles, Julia Robinson Math Festivals, and math wrangles in New Mexico and Arizona. He recently retired after 21 years at Santa Fe Preparatory School as computer department chair, computer science and mathematics teacher. He has been working with math circles for students and teachers since early 2006. Most recently James has led an eight-day workshop of math circles with computational extensions at Northern New Mexico College (NNMC), and has helped found several New Mexico math circles at 7-12 grade schools, as well as at NNMC and New Mexico Highlands University. He has been involved with the Alliance of Indigenous Math Circles, the Navajo Math Circles Project, Julia Robinson Math Festivals, and many math circles in classrooms.

James has also been involved since the late 1990s in teaching computational science and computer modeling in the US and Mexico, including teaching modeling workshops at the Santa Fe Institute and the MIT.

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October 2017

A Magus, Magic, and the Magnus Effect: And even maybe some amusing mathematics

Gordon McDonough and Elizabeth Martineau, Mathamuseum


Presenter's Essay and Bio

Presenter's Essay

This evening of science magic with Liz and Gordon will involve strange polymers, sleight of hand, weird math, and peculiar experiments with fluid dynamics

You will be challenged to observe carefully, think deeply, make wild predictions, ask silly questions, propose unrealistic tests, and communicate your conclusions.

If it sounds a little like The Scientific Method, don’t worry. No scientist actually follows The Scientific Method and neither do we. After all, this is not a science fair, but rather an evening of magic, fun, and mental gymnastics.

About the Presenters

Gordon McDonough

When I was born, in 1951, Harry S Truman was in his last months as President. That makes me older than most radioactive fallout. I grew up in a neighborhood outside Boston that was settled by faculty and staff of MIT and Harvard. There was a lot of education and even, eventually, a Nobel Prize. In some ways it was much like Los Alamos is today.

I couldn’t read effectively until I was in 7th or 8th grade when I discovered nonfiction. I found a copy of The Silent World by Jacques Yves Cousteau, and in spite of its having hardly any pictures and many pages, I devoured the book. I decided I was going to be a marine engineer and design and operate submersibles. Memorable reads in high school were a book about sports car design and another about pre-stressed concrete engineering.

The late 1960s were a time of major political unrest. Television was full of Vietnam. Dr. Martin Luther King, with whom I had once marched, was assassinated. The Chicago Seven were on trial, the ghettos were in flame, and the first computer game I ever saw was a version of Bombardment played on a time-sharing terminal with the gameplay printed out on green bar paper, whatever that was (hint—there was no video). I spent a lot of time making wordy pseudo-psychedelic posters about liberal causes and for my own forlorn campaign for President in 1988, when I would finally become of age. I didn’t win.

Pretty shy, I was bullied in the locker room, my friends were a small group of dorks, I tagged along behind a couple of truly engaged kids. I loved my physics class. I had a crush on my French teacher, though it didn’t help me do my homework. I sweated out my lines for a drama class. I had a job in a private girls’ school cafeteria kitchen with a bizarre assortment of misfits. I spent many hours walking alone in the woods. It was a pretty normal adolescence.

My aptitude test pegged me to become 1) a nurse, 2) a teacher, anddown around 5)an engineer. I flunked out of a medium quality engineering school in one semester. My mistake was other than support from my parents; it was not ever asking anyone for help. I flip-flopped around several departments before settling as an art major. I graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1973.

Since then, besides making art, I have been a restaurant steward, a home repairman, a commercial fisherman, a library clerk, a piano mover, a tent maker, a bakery pan washer, a library security guard, a children’s museum exhibit designer/builder, a tutor, a public middle school “Highly Qualified” science and social studies teacher, and a science outreach educator for the Bradbury Science Museum. I played Officer O’Hara in Los Alamos Little Theater’s most recent production of Arsenic and Old Lace. Now as I retire, I look forward to bringing up the Mathamuseum, making art, reading, riding my bikes, and helping make my world a better and more beautiful place.

Elizabeth Martineau

I was raised as a military brat, criss-crossing the US and Europe with my parents and sister. This required me to be in constant motion, always adjusting to new people and schools. Although I hate moving, I love experiencing new places. I am proud of hiking Cinque Terra (Italy), the Inca Trail (Peru), Maroon Bells, and a 14er (Colorado). My travels have instilled in me an appreciation for diversity and an insatiable curiosity to explore the world.

After earning an Education degree from Kansas State University, I began my teaching career in a small farm town. Later, I moved to Los Alamos, where I taught a variety of grades and subjects from kindergarten through middle school. I thought that I would be a school teacher for life, but life had other plans for me. I began working in a science museum, taking science programs around northern New Mexico. (If you ever had “Science on Wheels” visit your school, it could have been me!)

When the Cerro Grande Fire ripped through my community I saw homes destroyed and was forced to reevaluate what was important in life. I believe in the power of community, collaboration, and volunteering. So, you can often find me volunteering for community organizations, working at the Nature Center, teaching at the Art Center, and advocating for education and children.

I am recently retired and am enjoying the outdoors, quilting, and starting a business called the Mathamuseum. I do not know what my future holds, but I am looking for new opportunities.

Contact the presenter - remember to include your email address if you want a response.

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November 2017

Rivers: The arteries of Earth

Nicolas Sutfin, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Presenter's Essay and Bio

Presenter's Essay

About the Presenter

Nicolas Sutfin

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January 2018

Climate Modeling, Ice Sheets and Sea Level

Jeremy Fyke, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Presenter's Essay and Bio

Presenter's Essay


About the Presenter

Jeremy Fyke

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February 2018

Science, Security, and Nuclear Weapons

Joseph Martz, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Presenter's Essay and Bio

Presenter's Essay

About the Presenter

Joseph Martz

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March 2018

Applications of Quantum Dots

Hunter McDaniel, UbiQD, Los Alamos


Presenter's Essay and Bio

Presenter's Essay

About the Presenter

Hunter McDaniel

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